Author: whisperoftheshot

It’s been a while.

Hi everyone, how are you?

It’s been a while.

Hi everyone, how are you?

materialsscienceandengineering: Materials Testing: Tensile…


Brittle failure.


Ductile failure.


Test specimens.

materialsscienceandengineering:

Materials Testing: Tensile Tests

Extremely useful for determining various mechanical properties, the tensile test (or tension test, as it is also called) is one of the most common methods of materials testing. 

A tensile test is carried out by taking a sample of a material and subjecting it to increasing tension, stretching the sample until failure. This simple test results in the graph shown above (or something similar, depending on the material) called a stress-strain diagram. The elongation of the sample is determined with relation to the force required to produce such stretching and, knowing the cross-sectional area of the sample, the resulting stress and strain can be calculated and graphed.

This simple diagram gives a surprising number of mechanical properties, including the Modulus of Elasticity (or Young’s Modulus), yield strength, ultimate strength (also called ultimate tensile strength or tensile strength), and ductility (depending on the elongation before failure). Though less common, the stress-strain diagram can also be used to calculate the modulus of toughness and of resilience.

Along with the many properties that can be determined, another reason that tensile tests are so popular is that they can be used for almost any material. Depending on said material, the specimen is usually shaped similar to those in the bottom right image in what is called a ‘dog bone’ sample. The top left and bottom left images show brittle and ductile failure, respectively.

Sources: 1 2 3 4

Image sources: top left, top right, bottom left, bottom middle, bottom right

materialsscienceandengineering: Materials Testing: Tensile…


Brittle failure.


Ductile failure.


Test specimens.

materialsscienceandengineering:

Materials Testing: Tensile Tests

Extremely useful for determining various mechanical properties, the tensile test (or tension test, as it is also called) is one of the most common methods of materials testing. 

A tensile test is carried out by taking a sample of a material and subjecting it to increasing tension, stretching the sample until failure. This simple test results in the graph shown above (or something similar, depending on the material) called a stress-strain diagram. The elongation of the sample is determined with relation to the force required to produce such stretching and, knowing the cross-sectional area of the sample, the resulting stress and strain can be calculated and graphed.

This simple diagram gives a surprising number of mechanical properties, including the Modulus of Elasticity (or Young’s Modulus), yield strength, ultimate strength (also called ultimate tensile strength or tensile strength), and ductility (depending on the elongation before failure). Though less common, the stress-strain diagram can also be used to calculate the modulus of toughness and of resilience.

Along with the many properties that can be determined, another reason that tensile tests are so popular is that they can be used for almost any material. Depending on said material, the specimen is usually shaped similar to those in the bottom right image in what is called a ‘dog bone’ sample. The top left and bottom left images show brittle and ductile failure, respectively.

Sources: 1 2 3 4

Image sources: top left, top right, bottom left, bottom middle, bottom right

New Job

Hey so I am back after a short hiatus from staring a new job a few months ago and getting some home projects done.  Expect to see more posts showing up on your dashboard here soon.

Also don’t forget there is a submit page to share interesting projects.

New Job

Hey so I am back after a short hiatus from staring a new job a few months ago and getting some home projects done.  Expect to see more posts showing up on your dashboard here soon.

Also don’t forget there is a submit page to share interesting projects.

Hackaday Useful Tools LinksSo I am an avid reader of Hackaday…

Hackaday Useful Tools Links

So I am an avid reader of Hackaday for a long time now and they have been putting out a lot of great introductions to tools and processes to get makers up to speed on the resources that are available.  This is just a splattering of links that I have found lately that you guys might be interested in.

Do you guys have any other great resources that you’d like to share and/or are you enjoying this type of content?

Hackaday Useful Tools LinksSo I am an avid reader of Hackaday…

Hackaday Useful Tools Links

So I am an avid reader of Hackaday for a long time now and they have been putting out a lot of great introductions to tools and processes to get makers up to speed on the resources that are available.  This is just a splattering of links that I have found lately that you guys might be interested in.

Do you guys have any other great resources that you’d like to share and/or are you enjoying this type of content?

Elon Musk on the awesomeness of engineers from an interview with…

Elon Musk on the awesomeness of engineers from an interview with Engineering.com on 2012/4/27.

Elon Musk on the awesomeness of engineers from an interview with…

Elon Musk on the awesomeness of engineers from an interview with Engineering.com on 2012/4/27.